Amazon!

Today I fly to Toronto for the the Amazon First Novel Award ceremony. The other night Tom (Dr. Math) said: "I think you have a good shot at winning." To which I relied: "Not really. There are five other books." And he said: "Yes, 1 in 6. Those aren't bad odds." WHAT?

The award is given out tomorrow, Tuesday, May 22 at the Toronto Reference Library (6:30pm). All six of us finalists will do short readings on stage and have a small Q&A session with host Shelagh Rogers. I really hope they allow us to go off stage when they announce the winner. Because it's agonizing enough waiting for that envelope get opened, I can't imagine having to go through that while facing an audience!

Win or lose, the best part of these award ceremonies is always getting to know the other finalists.  Becky Toyne wrote a piece about us in the Globe and Mail and I was really interested to see that we are all 35+. People! It is never, ever too late to write your first novel. Last week I went to the launch of a beautiful debut called Catching the Light. The author, Susan Sinnott, is in her 70s. We're in a writing group together so I've been reading Susan's work and watching her at it for the past few years. Her commitment to doing the work, to undoing and re-doing and writing and re-writing, it is truly inspiring. That perseverance is, as I've said before, the fundamental non-negotiable of being a writer. You can have it in your 20s. You can have it in your 70s.

 

Big weekend

Good news! The Boat People is on the shortlist for the Amazon First Novel Award along with American War, The Bone Mother, The Water Beetles,  The Black Peacock, and Dazzle Patterns. I was at the Ottawa Writer's Festival all weekend and woke up on Saturday morning to an email about the short list. So I was floating on air all day.

In the evening I took part on a panel called Borders and Belonging at the Ottawa Writers Festival with Djamila Ibrahim and Arif Anwar. Their books are both beautiful, by the way, and they are genuinely warm and wonderful people and great fun as fellow panelists. I was having such a good time on stage and then afterward, meeting readers and signing books, that I totally forgot that over in Labrador AtsNL was hosting an award ceremony where I was up for the CBC Emerging Artist Award.

For the past few months, I've been going here and there, promoting the book, talking about how I became a writer, and in most interviews I end up saying some version of: "I would never have become a writer if I hadn't moved to St. John's." And it's 100% true. There are so many supports and grants and awards and opportunities for writers in my city. The Writers' Alliance of NL in particular has been really instrumental to my career. And a couple of months ago they got in touch to let me know they were nominating me for the CBC Emerging Artist Award. A few weeks ago, I was thrilled to learn I was on the short list (along with artist April White and the dynamic new PerSIStence Theatre Company) and only sorry that I was already scheduled to be in Ottawa and would miss the award ceremony in Labrador. On Saturday night, I returned quite late to my hotel room to find a message that I had won!

See? BIG WEEKEND.

I'm still in Ontario. I have a few work-related things to do in Toronto and then on Sunday I'm taking part in The Festival of Literary Diversity in Brampton, on a panel with Omar El Akkad and Cherie Dimaline, moderated by Ali Hassan, to talk about life after Canada Reads (and hopefully also our books!).